Episode #42 - The Blue Barn Kitchen's Hack To A healthy Lifestyle With Beth Nydick - Liz Lima - Blog Post

Episode #42 | The Blue Barn Kitchen’s Hack To A healthy Lifestyle With Beth Nydick


In today’s podcast, I am with Beth Nydick, an entrepreneur, writer and the business owner of the Blue Barn Kitchen. Blue Barn Kitchen has got everything from lifestyle hacks to meaningful food preparation and parenting. She recently published a cookbook called ‘Clean Cocktails, Righteous Recipes for Modern Mixologist’, which is now available at Amazon.

Beth’s business blossomed out of nowhere, it was a continuous efforts of preparation and hardwork. It was no overnight wonder. Beth Nydick shared about putting oneself out there, engaging in the community and to not compare your beginning with any other else’s beginning. Only you know what you’re ready for and what you intend to do, and you have to believe in that. Blue Barn Kitchen is a testimony of all the small steps accumulated into this exponential thing that inspires women it reaches.

Venus Warriors - Woman Empowerment Movement - Ultimate Guide - Liz Lima

How To Find Your Inner Venus Warrior!

Tell me where to send this guide and I'll email it to you right away!

This guide can help you find your inner venus warrior.

In this podcast, we also cover:

01:32 - The blue barn kitchen’s hack to a healthy lifestyle

06:10 - How it started

07:19 - Being a food blogger

09:36 - Making connections

13:30 - Convincing a publishing company to invest

17:39 - Being a successful feminist

23:06 - Hashtag no filter and red table diaries

Nothing is ever easy, but there are goals that are worth the struggle. Taking time to know what you want to do in life, with what kind of people you would want yourself to associate with, and with what vision you’d want to journey into, is the start of a worthwhile progress and growth. People have varied capabilities, strengths, and weaknesses per se, and it is up to each of us where we put the stress. It is important to go with what you love to do and be the best at it. In that way, more women will get to inspire each other to pursue their purpose.

You could check out Blue Bark Kitchen today and figure out its hacks to a healthy lifestyle.

Check out more of Beth Nydick’s work with these links:

More of Blue Barn Kitchen: https://bluebarnkitchen.com/ 

Clean Cocktails, Righteous Recipes for Modern Mixologist: https://www.amazon.com/Clean-Cocktails-Righteous-Modernist-Mixologist/dp/1682681408

Check out these blogs for more:

Liz:

Welcome back to Venus Warriors. Thanks for being here for our Friday episodes, which are the episodes where I interview women who I feel have found their intervenous warrior because they've either changed what they were doing in their life, started their own business, or just completely went on a different track from what they were. And I want you to hear their stories because you'll know that yes, they've done it so you can too. And it's really just reassurance of knowing that yes, anything is possible. But today we have a really special guest. Beth is here. How are you?

Beth:

I'm great. Thank you so much for having me.

Liz:

Absolutely. You've had some pretty impressive stuff going on in your life and I know that you have some books that you've already had out, but you've done so much and you might be pivoting. So why don't you tell our listeners what it is that you do? What is Your Business?

Beth:

Okay, so right now I actually have two businesses. I have blue barn kitchen was as a healthy lifestyle. I call it like a depot now. It's got everything from cleanses to an hacks on how to have a healthy lifestyle, meaning food thoughts, parenting. It's really more about, my life and how I can share it with you. Just as an example of, for example, last night I made dinner in 20 minutes because that's all I had and I shared it on my social media. And I know other women really enjoy that because they're like, oh, you can do that in 12 minutes and still have a healthy meal. Yeah, exactly. But people really enjoy that. I have a cookbook that came out last year called clean cocktails, righteous recipes for the modern mixologist. I like a good cocktail. I don't know if all your listeners do, I'm know a big portion of them do.

Beth:

So when it's drinking a cocktail that you can enjoy and not feel bad about, but the line is like why waste everything you do in the gym on one month libido?

Liz:

Yes, Exactly. Yeah. The listeners are anything like me then yes, they like to drink a cocktail. So yes,

Beth:

Exactly. Come cocktail but through that, what I found is that I really been able to reach women with the story of how I got the book published because I don't have 50,000 followers. I found a friend, a new friend, somebody I didn't know who I was. I pitched the book. who liked the idea. So enrolling other people in your idea to help it be come to fruition. But I realized that people really needed these, that support for around persistence and perseverance. Mindset. Not so much like the Wu mindset, which I do like enjoy the universe having my back and everything.

Beth:

But really the like, why not me? That's a big one. People are like, why me? It's like your message is your message and you're unique. So why not you? Why can't you be on the today show? Who Cares? This girl's on the today show every day. Why? She was a nobody one day too. So it's really opening people's eyes to that perspective. But I think that small business owners and women like us entrepreneurs really need that help getting exposed to a bigger audience. Now, I don't get a bigger audience like the today show. You need to work your way up to that. But really getting locally known, regionally known, and then nationally known. You know, I get a lot of people like how did you get on TV? I got on TV through five or six years of hard work and then it was by chance and it was like somebody seeing my stuff.

Beth:

But if I didn't lay all that groundwork and that would have never happened in creating those opportunities for yourself within your own sphere is so much easier than people understand and they don't take advantage of those things that are around them. You know, I spoke for free for years, but I spoke everywhere I could so that when I was ready to get paid to speak on stage, I was ready for it. Yeah. Right. So I'm doing a little, like you said, I do a little bit of everything.

Liz:

Yeah. And, but the cool thing is, is like, even though you're saying the, yeah, it was five years of hard work that can apply to anything that someone is trying to achieve. Right. We're not going to say overnight. I'm not always 20 pounds overnight. Right. So everyone sees it. Everyone will see.

Liz:

No. And everything will, everyone will see the end. Right. They don't see your journey along the way. And then it's almost like, oh well they, you know, they lost weight. Yeah. But they did all this stuff before it too. Right. So I like how you said that because everyone's got the tip of the ice berg.

Beth:

Yeah. Like don't come. They don't compare your beginning to somebody else. Don't compare your beginning to somebody else's middle. I have clients come to me, they're like, I want to be a cuff post right now. I'm like, you're not ready for huffpost. You're not ready for Forbes magazine. You're ready for your local newspaper. You're ready for New Jersey monthly. Like I'm in Jersey. You're ready for that. And then once you get to that, like there is a progression. And sometimes people, yes, they jumped over that progression.

Beth:

But to be then you need to go back. I had, I was talking yesterday to a new client and she was like, well what do you get from TV? You don't get clients from TV? Nope. You get credibility, you get more opportunities from TV, but you don't normally get lots and lots of clients. You get clients from being in magazines doing podcasts like yours, having a community of people who for you in that way and choose you.

Liz:

Right? Yup. So then, Right. So, okay. So, but before we go into that, how, so the first thing you did was the like the entire life, quote unquote like healthiness, right? The food, you're lifestyle, parenting, all of that. So how did you, how did you start there? Like why did you start there?

Beth:

So there's an event in New York, I think it's, it's moves around the country too, but it's called blog her.

Beth:

It's a blogger event. I was just doing health coaching, you know, like out of my house, just focusing on divorced dads and menopausal women. Like that was my clientele. But I went to this event and I was like, oh, brands can pay you to write about them. Oh. And like to be completely honest, I met all these women there and I was like, I'm smarter than these girls, I can do this. So I really started working with law with brands. I think my first brand was a glue and I invited all my friends over and it glue sent me like big things and I had them on the table and we did a pizza party and I took a picture of that everything. And it just started kind of snowballing from that. I really just put out great content. I put out what I was making.

Beth:

I just, I took the time to do the photographs. I missed that part of it cause I really liked that creativity of doing the photographs and associate producer at the Dr Oz show was one of my followers. She was in a meeting, oh we need food bloggers. And they put me on the list and I, and I answered the email fast. That was, that's like, that's how it works. You know, that you can pitch yourself over and over and over again. That's, it works like that a lot. But it also works like you just happen to be in the right place at the right time. And that's a lot of my life. Well, yes, very consistent. You know, every week I would put out, well cause I would just take pictures of what I was making. I didn't have that forethought.

Beth:

Like I w I'm not a big planner in that way. Like I didn't have a plan I was making six weeks from now. I was like a week out. So I was always crazy rushing. And it was just literally like, I think what they really liked, it was sweet potato, black bean tacos. They just liked it. It's like that, that's what they liked, you know, and I've had a lot of that. They just like what I'm putting out. Somebody like me, I used to do like 'em and I'm gonna be doing that again. I would do one hour cook with me sessions on Sunday nights and I got a lot of feedback from that. It also helped me be on camera. It helped me connect with an audience and it helped me make dinner for my family.

Liz:

Yup. See, so, okay. But then let's go back even further. Why did you even go to the blogging event?

Beth:

I was lonely. That's why I went and I talked about this to my clients as well. Now with the, those are like, I go to events to meet people, scenes with other people who do the same thing I do to create that kind of community, in person because I'm over 40 and I'm not the online community, a part of them, but I liked it. I like to have a drink with you and shake your hand.

Liz:

Me Too. Absolutely. So and this is now was this because I thought it was cute.

Beth:

So you know, I'm over 40 and I grew up like having to talk to people. So I like to go make those connections and I, and a big part of what we do, I work with a lot of millennials. I work with the women and the men that I meet that are in PR that the head of the brand management brand branding or the know the work of blockers are in their late twenties, early thirties. They need to meet me in person. I need to be able to connect with them in person. On a different level. It's not a mommy level with some of them. I do act honestly because they're on TV and I talk about how I remember what it was like. I have that kind of relationship with some of them, but I need to meet them in person because then I connect better. I feel like I connect better in person than on online. Okay. Maybe and not because make sense.

Liz:

Oh absolutely. I'm the same exact way. I want to meet people. I want to be in front of people because that's just the way that I work too. I'm also a little bit over 40.

Beth:

Exactly. We don't look at it all. No good. But I think it's important, you know that if you have, you really listen to what people are saying, saying it's all about your community, your business besties. I call them my business beauties and I've been like, you know, like meeting you. I've really gone purposely to make relationships with people who I think are doing amazing things, who I think have a great point of view, who I think are a lot of fun. Anybody who wants to have a cocktail with, I want to connect with. I do it purposely. I'm going to an event in New York City, a PR event on Wednesday. Um, and my friend's like, why are you going? And I was like, I'm going to meet people cause I want, the more people I can meet, the more people I can collaborate with and more people that I can help support them, they'll support me. It just works better for me. I'm tired of being in my house by or six hours a day writing.

Liz:

I hear that. That's so my, so my problem is is that I'm out too much I think because I just want to be with people all the time and then I'm just trying to shove in content here and there because I just, yeah, so maybe I need to do more like live events. Maybe that's what I need to do because it's just the way that I feel. I completely agree with you.

Beth:

It's like time blocking. Yeah, it's like time blocking like this. It's week. Let's see, Monday I have a mastermind, Tuesday might have new interns coming. I'm very excited. Wednesday I have an event in the city, but Thursday and Friday I'm doing work. So every week I'm at least in my office, two to three days a week. And then I try only two days a week out of the office. You know, if I can like squeeze in like a 45 minute coffee with a friend. It happens once a month. But right now I'm in creation mode so I'm even more at home.

Liz:

Yeah, right. It's stages, right? It seasons.

Beth:

Seasons. Exactly. Yeah. They let a season. I was never home. I was always out mixing drinks.

Liz:

Yup. And I remember you said it was funny, you were like, I think I was drunk for how long when you wrote that book?

Beth:

The first three months of that year I had a try. I had to make all the drinks, had to try them out, you know, with our neck or working on our next book. We're just going to have a lot more foods. I'm cooking a lot more. My kids are very happy.

Liz:

That's cool. So, okay, so what now, how did that concept come about?

Beth:

It was just a, it wasn't natural concept. Our readers and our followers and our clients were like, okay, we have the cocktails, but now what's next?

Beth:

So we're creating the what's next. It was a the book getting the book made was a huge learning experience, learning curve. It was not only about how to get the book made, but it was, it was a lot of growth. It was a lot of crying, a lot of pain. You know, I would never not have done it, but it was a lot more than I thought it was ever going to be. It's a whole new level of putting yourself out there. You know, I convinced my partner and I convinced a publishing company to invest in us. We had to show up and be way, you know, we're, we're in a second in our goal was not one book. Our goal is three books. So not only is it showing up, but it's showing up the right way and we killed ourselves.

Beth:

We hired people, we killed ourselves to get the right PR. You know, we are in the almost done with selling or second printing. Which will just help us get the next book deal. It's really, it's not only the content is, it's the strategy behind getting to the goal from the content as well.

Liz:

So, the point is on that is, is that nothing, nothing is ever easy. That's worth it. Right.

Beth:

Nothing is ever easy. No, I can't, like let's think what's easy, nothing is easy. You know, I find parenting much easier than owning a business.

Liz:

Oh my God. Yes. I totally agree with that.

Beth:

Like I thought that's about, I'm thinking like of my life, you know, having teenage boys is a lot easier than anything else.

Liz:

Yeah. I'm not even close to that. The eight year old and the a six year old,

Beth:

See, I feel that's still difficult. But no, I think the easiest part for me is really supporting other people. You know, every time I talk to somebody about their business I have, I will all these ideas that I want to help them with. So sometimes for me it's easier to help other people with their business instead of myself. And that's why I'm starting to do more coaching in that area because I know it's one of my super powers. And I know that I can be helpful. I'm really trying to be in service and every aspect of my life.

Liz:

Yeah. But don't you think that it comes naturally? Like if it's your gift, it comes naturally. Right.

Beth:

100%. And I think that's part of my husband had to convinced me what it was. He was like, It's like that shit. I'm like, I'm like, well, you know what needs to be more tangible and it needs to be this and, and he's like that.

Beth:

Yeah. Oh, it doesn't, it's just, it was, it's hard for me to recognize. And I had clients, I had a client yesterday or two days ago, but not that it matters the other day I had, you know, we created a business for herself, for herself. It's working, she's making money and she's not satisfied. So the conversation around that is like, you created your, you've reached your goal. Why is it enough? So it is, it is a little therapy because we're all kind of stuck in what our parents did to us. But you know, it's the, I'm not enough. It's not enough. It will never be enough that you need to switch that. So I'm more than enough. It's always enough and I'm always going to be seen as more than enough because I can see myself as less than, but you all are in see myself as more than. So if I can trust in your trust in me and I can move myself further, even the most dark times.

Liz:

Yup. That's okay. So there's so many things that you've said already that way too much alike and it's kind of freaky. So the title, so I am writing a book now. I know I'm so excited for you and thank you. And it is a bitch. It's like you said, I was like, oh, I didn't think it was ever going to be like this. Oh my God, I feel like I feel the resistance. Like, I completely feel the resistance of like trying to write some of this stuff out and it's crazy. But the title of my book is, you know, just like you said, that whole, I am enough. The title of my book is I am enough is bullshit because you just hit it on the head.

Liz:

You said you're more than enough, so it's more, right. It's so you put you, people are putting themselves in that, in that statement like, oh, I'm enough. To me, the way I interpret it, it's like you're bringing yourself down. Like there's no openness to that. Your mind is not open. Nothing is open. It's almost like you're kind of, you just shielded yourself off of everything

Beth:

You did. I think it's a stage and I think that we talked about that offline. Like you have to get to the, even the thought of being I'm enough to be able to get past it. But it's that box that we're told to be in the box. We're told to be a certain way, all that kind of stuff, and most entrepreneurs don't listen to that. That's why they're entrepreneurs basically, you know, and I kind of see like this, a new trend of those women empowerment can really be, it can really hurt you instead of help you.

Beth:

Because I'm not only, we host to be feminists, proposed to be successful feminists and we're posting, we're supposed to be something. We're supposed to be even more than we thought we were supposed to be. Yeah. But not, but not on the same plane that we can start at because not everybody has, not everyone has is lucky enough to have kids like we are not everyone is lucky enough to have a sustainable business. Not every, you know, not everyone is lucky enough to be in that situation, but if you really listen to people's stories, the people that really project themselves and launch off into the stratosphere, we're cleaning toilets at one point. Yup. Who didn't have two parents home who didn't have enough money for shoes like that struggle in there, I think gives them that fire to be able to move past that right away.

Beth:

And if you, if you didn't have to struggle as much, you had a nice childhood, you have a nice life. Sometimes you get stuck in that because you had the luxury of being stuck in that,

Liz:

Right? Yup. And there's nothing, and the thing is too on top of that is that maybe it's right there. They may come to a point where they've had enough, or maybe they come to a point where they wake up. I know like it was me. You wake up and you're like, so I've, I drove like my entire life I did this and this and this and this and this. Right. And then one day you wake up and you're like, this is what I created and okay, kinda sucks.

Beth:

Right. And then it's pivoting the change, you know? Nope, I didn't have that experience. You know, my kids were home, I got to be home with them.

Beth:

But I always was like an entrepreneur. I always have. I sold pocket books. I made like, you know, like baby bags and China and had them shipped over. You know, I did a lot of kind of stuff. And it was for me, it was a choice. It was like, okay, what am I really interested in and what do I want to, what do I want to talk about for the next five years? And that was food and nutrition. But that's, if I had been starting food in nutrition, I would never now be being able to be motivating people, inspiring people, and helping people be their best who I had to go through all of that, which was a lot of crying and a lot of yelling and screaming at myself and a lot of self propulsion than anything else.

Liz:

Right. But you may, but you got to the point where you made a decision. You didn't just stay where you were, you made the decision and you did something about it. Yeah. Right. No, totally. So maybe some people just need some, I know that some people just need to know that they can make a different decision. You don't have to stay what you've already decided before.

Beth:

No, it just takes up. City rave just has to be rave. Right. I recently bought it. I was in Philly and like this cute little store in old town, Old City. I bought this little ring that said it's upstairs. It says be brave and I wear it every day. Nope. Because I need to remind myself that I need to continue to be brave every single day and it's really helping me. I really like it. Like I didn't think I was like, okay, whatever, I'll buy it at Dah, Dah, Dah. And I'm like, I put so much energy into it and so much, so into it that when I don't wear it I'm like, oh, I need to put my brain, bring on.

Beth:

So I used to have a bracelet that said hustle when I was really in the thick of hustling. Like whatever those little things are, if you need to listen to some meditation in the morning, you need to put on your mirror and lipstick. Be Brave. I'm more than enough. Whatever it is. Get your, get somebody else who can really support you. Read your book. When it's out, do something cause not being an action as a worst place today for me it is. Yeah. Okay. No, it's a plane.

Liz:

That's when everything starts piling in your, in your head. Right. And, and this is the thing, like I purposely the other day put out a post on purpose to share the truth. Like I'm not always super positive, happy, motivational inspiration person. It's not possible. No. Everyone goes through shit all the time. Right. And the differences is that if you can get out of it and you know how to get out of it but you keep moving forward.

Liz:

Right. But I put that out on purpose so people know, hey, I go through crap too. So it's almost like an opening of like, yeah, you're going to go through it too. And it's okay.

Beth:

100% and and that actually failing, it's been in the bin on the lips of a lot of the big people. Aly, the woman that runs spanx. She just put out a post. Did you see that? No. Failing is the best thing that ever happened to her. Gary Vaynerchuk is talking about failing. Like we have to show everyone's done with like the Instagram filter and they want once real. So I, I've been putting out a couple of posts like that. Like for example, I, I went to event for poise which to be in for light bladder leakage. They had a blogger event. I honestly read it really fast the first time and I thought it was ponds.

Beth:

So when I got there I was a little confused and it was like, why are we talking about moisturizer? But anyway, it was interesting and it was interesting and this wonderful trainer and this gynecologist were talking about it and I had light bladder leakage. I have two kids. I think that everybody, I do light bladder leakage and no one but no one talks about it. So I put a post, no one liked it, no one commented, but I got 17 dms. Like I hope that you got a lot of feedback. I did see that post and I think I liked it, but I, I hope you got a lot of feedback because I think the more and more that we're honest with the way that we're feeling in the way that we're doing and we're not so scared of being a hundred percent vulnerable, will not only help a lot of people, but it also propel our businesses forward.

Beth:

I did a, another post that was called Hashtag no filter and it was all about being real. Jada Pinkett Smith has that new show on Facebook called the Red Table diaries. Oh yes. So first of all, I love Jadah and I met her in person a couple months ago and she looks at her skin is like the most gorgeous and her mom too, they were together, her mom's skin also, it was like the most gorgeous skin ever and I feel like she's so impressive for where she came from to where she is now. She literally sits down with her family, with celebrities and has an actual real deep like deep, Cutting conversation. She had a conversation. I think somebody that cheated was somebody that she was with at one time and had a conversation with like the other woman. But it's not about yelling and screaming and blame. It wasn't, it's really not.

Beth:

So I, and I was so inspired by that and I really try to show, I don't, I really don't try to show the signing the Shenae this sunny, shy, sunny side yeah. Of My life. I really just kind of show what's going on. Sometimes yeah, sometimes I fail and sometimes I don't, but it's really okay. It's hard to sometimes be that vulnerable, through the, through a program that we're doing that I'm doing. Somebody suggested to put on Facebook like, how do you see me? Yeah, That and I did, I did it on a page that I normally don't put it on and I put it on at like 1145 at night. So I was hiding a little bit, but I got 11 responses. My initial thought was 11. That's not enough. See? Yeah. That was my like, and then I read through them.

Beth:

My response was, well, everyone sees me the way that I want to be seen. Awesome. But why wasn't there more and still bothering me? Like why, why wasn't that enough? Why wasn't those 11 people being honest with me and how they felt about me, um, enough for me to be like, great, move on. And why couldn't I be honest enough with myself and put it on like my town's page where everybody knows me and everyone will write something because I'm not sure they will. I'm not sure they'll see me the way or the else that I want to be seen and I'm not sure I want to hear those responses. So We'll see. Watch out and we'll see if I do it.

Liz:

This will be your, that, that that's your action item would take session. So you need to figure out when you're going to do that by.

Beth:

And it was interesting, like only one of my good friends wrote anything. It was really people that I just kind of know peripherally, peripherally. But it was, I think everyone should do it. I think it was really an interesting exercise.

Liz:

I've done that. I've actually done it too. The people, through email and I did that and I did it. It's been two years now. But yeah, it's, it's, it's eye-opening what people and though and the ones that actually will reply to an email, right? Yes. Even more. Yeah. So it's eye opening, but it's, the thing is, is that if you are your authentic self, then it should have been fine. Right. And there was, there you go.

Beth:

For me it was like, why didn't I have 25 people commenting? Why was it only 11 people? Yup. No, I need more feedback. I need more information because my thing is always it needs to be more. It's not about me being enough, it's just I need more of that. I need more TV, I need more people on my list. I mean, it's always more, more working on it. You know, and I see my, I see one of my kids kind of falling into that and I work very hard to like [inaudible] like, no, don't inherit that one. Take a different one. No, don't in everything. Don't take that characteristic. Let's take that one. You know? But having conversations with him about why he thinks that way allows me to explore why I think that way. And, you know, a percent better. Yup. 1% at a time.

Liz:

Yeah. Well, the biggest thing you've already done is that you've acknowledged it so you're aware of it. That's, that's huge. We would still be in denial or not even realize it. Right?

Beth:

Yeah. Well I've done a lot of work. I think you, I think we talked about that too. I've done a lot of this kind of work on my, just on myself. My family comes from that kind of work. They've all done some work like that. I parent like that. I think it's helped me a lot. I made my husband do it before we got married. So I, I come from that. It's e it's easier for me to think like that. I wish that more people would open themselves up to it because it just, it makes you understand that nothing means anything until you make it mean something. Nope. Everything. Yes. You put the meeting on everything. Everything. Like you called me, I didn't call you back. What does that mean? I hate you.

Beth:

You're not my friend. I'm bothering her. Like you can make a story about that whole thing or, or the knee or you could decide she's busy. Something must've happened. Like all this stuff. No, I just didn't call you back. That's definitely, that's it. That's it though. That makes me happier thinking like that. I think that it's caused me some relationships cause not everyone can understand that. I think like that. But it helps. It helps my, it helps me keep my armor.

Liz:

Right. You know? And it's, it's a difficult thing. Like we've been through it and we're always learning and growing and working on ourselves. So for us it's, it's just, it's our norm now, right. That it's, sometimes it's difficult to remember how it was before and why, you know, sometimes I have to, sometimes I have to stop myself and, and think and realize, okay, they don't think the way I think at all, like at all. And it's, and it's not the norm, right?

Beth:

It's not, it's getting more norm like you know, Tony, Tony Roberts and dean Graziano keep talking about key, watching them talking about it. Um, they're like, they want to bring knowledge and the this learning tool to everybody. But I was at a friend's the other day and she does not know anything on Facebook or Instagram beyond the posting. It's not in her realm. Nope. So she did the whole online world that we live in. And that's some of your listeners probably live into, is it not in there? The realm of consciousness. So when we expect people to show up, okay. For us that don't understand even what we, where we are, what we're talking about, either in business or in life or in philosophy, like you have to, you can't, you'll be disappointed. You need to meet people where they are, not where you exactly.

Beth:

You know, I told my kids, you love your friends who like your friends for who they are. You love them for who they're not. Yes. Oh, that's a great one. I have to use that. You should tell your kids because we all have faults and we all have things and I have a lot of friends that I've had for 20, 30, 40 years. And you really, I love them deeply, but I love them for all their faults and all the things that I don't understand. And that way we have a great relationship and I'm not a drama girl and I don't fight with my, like I don't do that thing.

Liz:

Oh my God. Yeah. No, we talk about how like my friend calls me randomly, like we don't talk for awhile. Right. Cause you know we have lives and we're right. And she's like, I'm so glad that I'm, we can just talk if we haven't talked in like five weeks and it's just talking, we're calling on God. Right? Like I was like, wait, do people still like get upset with all that crap? And she's like, Oh yeah. Oh yeah. I'm like, really?

Beth:

Yeah, I'm in the same boat as you are. Like people tell me stuff about, people in town and helps set up stuff works. And I'm like, wait, that's how it works. But it's so funny to said that because my post on Instagram two days ago was about me having coffee with a friend who I don't talk to and is exactly what I wrote, see where we're destined to be besties. I wrote exactly what you just said. Like it's so great to have friends that don't need to speak to for a while and it's like I just spoke to them yesterday. Yes. Because our lives work that way and we're alone all the time. So it's my friends who work in offices don't quite understand what I mean more like I need more of you because I don't have anybody else. And that's why now I go to events and I'm trying to have this community of people IRL, so that I can go get coffee with them and talk about how my insights on Instagram are declining because I'm not posting enough instead of, so my daughter wants a butter sweatshirt and she already has four. Gotcha.

Liz:

Yeah, you have to tell me about the events in the city because we love the city and I will drive over there in a heartbeat. Okay, cool. Yeah, wow. This is so cool. Um, let's see. So, so new venture still doing the book, the cookbook, which I'm actually excited cause I like the, I want to see how this food thing is gonna evolve from the cocktail thing.

Beth:

That's really going to be interesting. We haven't flushed the whole thing out yet. But I really like to sh my whole thing is sharing food. And for me it's always been so when my kids were little it was like, okay, what do you, what can I, what can I do to make a business out of? So it was like, well I can cook, I'm a good cook and I like to cook so I'm going to have, start making cooking classes in my kitchen.

Beth:

Yeah. And that's essentially where I really started doing it was because I went to lunch at the s my kids elementary school's right there. So I'm like, I went to lunch at school and if the kids are eating fritos and those like, I don't even remember what they're called, like the sandwich peanut butter and Jelly, like in the bread already. Yeah. The white bread with all the carcinogenics and the Jelly and it like made me sick, like, honestly made me sick and my kids would okay. I was Bree and I parents say I brainwashed my children, which I 100% brainwashed my children even so much that by son. I remember in like third grade, a friend of his was eating a lunchable. Yeah. He made his friend cry because he was telling him how awful his lunch was.

Liz:

Dude. Okay. Real quick. We just had field day with my school and my friend, we're very fallacious. I have a best friend since kindergarten. She's like Liz and she's super like nutrition, like she's right health and all that stuff. And she's like, but Liz, come on. My son was like, oh my God, you're drinking soda. Why are you drinking soda? Don't drink. So like, he's literally like policing.

Beth:

He's one of mine. Yeah. I love it. That was hilarious. Okay. Sorry. Continue. It's important. I forgot my train of thought. No, it's important. So I just wanted something to do, that was connecting the people and like we were talking about before, so I'm a middle child. I have a younger brother who was the king of the hill, not according to him according to me and my sister and my sister was five years older. Okay. So, and I, I've always been very self sufficient so I really feel like a lot of my needing to be seen and heard. It comes from being a middle child. Okay. And I free and I'm free with that. And I think that people need to acknowledge that about themselves. Like w like being self aware and why you have, why you do things. Like I tell my therapist all the time, I'm like, I know why I do it.

Beth:

I said to figure out how to like a way around it. And he's like, yes you do. But I guess I wanted something where I could be seen and heard because I knew that I had great ideas. I knew I had a unique way of looking at things and I knew I could connect with people. So it's really starting from there. You know, once you can, like you said, once you can figure out that you were more than enough and that your message can mean something, creating that message around what you're good at. Yep. And the things that are easy for you, like your super power, like the things that you can see beyond anybody else. I wish I could garden. I can't, like I, I'm looking at my herbs right now. There's so sad. My mom came over, she was like, you know, you need to water these. I'm like, every day, like I just don't, I killed plants. Yeah. I kill my 14 year olds. Like I'll water the mommy.

Beth:

My friend gave me Broccoli sprouts to grow and she put me in this Facebook group and she's growing all these Broccoli's Brad's okay. Like you have to water them every day. Like two days later I was like, can I, are they dead yet? She's like, just try. I got a couple of scraps, but that's just not my superpower. I'm just, that's not my thing. Nope, go. I'm okay with dressing myself. I can kind of figure that part out. Yeah, there's stuff I can't, I'm creative but not artistic like you have to, you have to figure out where your things are. And when I watch women who are stylists, I'm always in awe or makeup artists or painters or any of that kind of stuff. So for your listeners to really, you know, my coach helps and say write a list myself. Self would never write a list.

Beth:

We just think about it like, like what are those three things that you do that your friends ask you about that you find easy that you're like why? Why can't everyone else do this and that you enjoy and just start from there. Hmm.

Liz:

Yeah. I like how your husband called you out cause mine did too. Why? Why aren't you doing this? I'm like, what are you talking about? He's like, you have been a life, a life coach forever. Why are you going to get the certification? I'm like, I don't know what you're talking about.

Beth:

Cause you needed some credibility. Yeah. You felt like you needed to credibility?

Liz:

I did. Yeah. And I think that also comes because of like, you know, the, the three bachelors and three master's degrees that I have, cause that was totally sucked into my, like it was shoved into my brain that you have to have credibility. Right. So I've expensive papers on my wall that I'm looking at right now.

Beth:

And you had to kind of experience through them and you, I'm sure you've helped people using them. Oh yeah. Yeah. But depends good things with them.

Liz:

Yeah. But I liked that and I think that's great. The way you say it is, is the one way for people to see that is, what is it that people are always asking you about?

Beth:

Yes. Like when my kids were little and I was making my own baby food and everyone's aren't making fun of me until they started making baby food and started asking you all the questions. Then when I was like, I need a little credibility. So that's when I got my certification because I wanted to know more to be able to help them. But it was really like, and I'm, there was nothing else for me to do.

Beth:

So I'm an ex TV producer and I wasn't going to go back to that 14, 16 hour day lifestyle that wasn't happening. Thank God I was able to stay home with the kids, but I still needed something that was all about me. And then I can talk to them a place of, of wellness and I could talk from a place of knowledge. But now I look out on the landscape and like you don't need a certification or anything. Nope. You know, I'm an expert in Blah. Okay. Yeah. And that's part of like the nutrition field is kind of losing its muster for me because I see so much infer misinformation. That it's scary. So if I can really support women and men and families just by showing them what I eat and what I make, you know, making a great cookbook, showing them the cocktails that can make, that's my little contribution.

Beth:

But the other part of it, I think you need to find people that have, that actually know what they're talking about. And that's in business too. You know, I'm putting together this whole program about getting yourself exposure and, and nontraditional media ways. So I'm watching what other people are doing and I'm watching this one woman who I was saying the opposite of what I believe. So that's that to me, there's room for everybody. Yep. Whatever your ideas are, whatever your ideals are. I know that this woman spent $18,000 on a car, on a [inaudible] coach, on a career coach, you know, business coach. And I see that business coaches works different places and she's fantastic, but you and I would love to hire her. She's a lot of money, but I see she's worth it. Yeah. No matter how much you spend on your business coach and all the courses that you do and all the things that you buy, unless you have that need, and that's really what your superpower is, you're still going to be treading water.

Beth:

And that's it. It's, you know, for me it's all about taking the hustle back and the hustle, meaning using what? Using your good for others and being able to spread that word. And not in an unbalanced way, but really just really working to get your message out there because you know that you are saying something that's important. You're saying something that the world needs to hear and you're doing a disservice to those people if you're not going to follow through with it. But it's really f and hard. I'm not a big cursor.

Beth:

I'll say a couple of words. I'll say a couple of words, but I'm not a big cursor. It's really hard. I get it. It's draining and it's not life affirming. It's like, it's like you want some time, time. I just want to lay in bed and watch TV all day and make it all go away. Because it's really, really hard and I think that a lot of people don't understand that getting into it. I think, like we said in the beginning, they look at the middle, not at the beginning, but if you can find yourself, one person that's believes in you or those times where you might not believe in yourself and you never know, you don't like to start a business, start a hobby, started, start an interest, start something. But if you're not where you want to be and you're feel stuck and you feel like you need something outside yourself and listen to your podcast every week.

Beth:

And just be inspired and just be okay with, that's what I'm doing right now and stop being in such a hurry to get somewhere. Just be in that space of way of being okay with what your message is and what you want to do. Either give it to this figure this thick. And that's really where you need to start. And have cocktails while you do it, but not too many.

Liz:

Ah, it's easy. Oh, that's awesome. Cool. So how could, how can anybody, like how can the listeners find you read more about you. Where can we get that info?

Beth:

Well, you can just Google Beth, Natick and Y D I c k New York, Dick. I know I knew Mike. Yeah, you like it though. I did it. I do like it.

Beth:

And you can Google that night and you'll find lots of stuff about me. My handle, a lot of my pro social media platforms are Blue Barn Kitchen. That's the name of my health and wellness site. www.bethknight.com/ is coming. I got my big, my big ass picture on the front page. So we're building, working on all the texts. Right. But I'm really open to like if your listeners have a question, go to my Facebook and send me a DM or my Instagram, send me a DM. I'd love to talk to you because I get the, I get the most fulfillment out of helping everybody. So if there's somebody that you really follow, there's somebody that you really like, Liz is your idol cause she's mine. DM her dmed somebody's the DM. Anybody that you like? I bet you a little answer.

Liz:

Oh absolutely. Yeah. And everything. Everything that you say, I'm going to put it in the show notes so they know where it's about misspelling New York.

Beth:

It's going to be so happy. That's why it's Beth Nydick on everything. I am. Everything I produce, it's my whole name.

Liz:

I love it. Oh my God. Thank you so much.

Beth:

Thank you. Always, and we'll definitely have to catch up in the city next time I have an event, I'll let you know. You'll meet me. That'd be awesome.

Liz:

Oh my gosh. Yes, that would be great.

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