Episode #43 - More Into The Every Heart Project and Savvy Girl Media - Liz Lima - Blog Post

More Into The Every Heart Project and Savvy Girl Media With Janet Bernstein


In today’s podcast, I am with Janet Bernstein, a businesswoman and a life coach. She currently have two businesses, namely, the Every Heart Project and the Savvy Girl Media, both of which have different yet relatable platforms. Janet Bernstein, through her projects, empower women as a life coach and entrepreneur. She gathers women for lunch, dinner dates, and meetings to talk about how they want to go on about their businesses and how to manage the stresses in their daily activities, struggles and crossroads.

Sometimes we set aside our dreams and aspirations for something more practical that could pay the bills. Every Heart Project and the Savvy Girl Media dives into women interactions that inspire each other to believe in pursuing their purpose. Janet Bernstein also opened about how the different closed doors have opened new opportunities for growth and that failures are God’s way of realigning you to what you’re meant to fulfill and do.

Venus Warriors - Woman Empowerment Movement - Ultimate Guide - Liz Lima

How To Find Your Inner Venus Warrior!

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This guide can help you find your inner venus warrior.

Through coaching and daily interactions with women who have relatable circumstances in life, you get to discover more about what makes a person and you start to understand the choices that they have and the potentials that they can further tap.

Janet Bernstein have written a couple of books along her journey and one of them is entitled ‘Pizza on the Floor’ which showcases her story about having a mom with borderline personality disorder. You can check it out here.

Check out her website here: EveryHeartProject.com   or  savvygirlmedia.com

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Liz:

Well, thank you for being here. Venus Warriors. You know, this is our special additions of our interviews that I hold on Fridays and every Friday I have a woman who I feel has that found their Venus Warrior inside and has gone over some whatever struggles or obstacles or challenges, but has now gone after their passion, their purpose. They're either in a service business, they started their own business, their coaching, but whatever it is, they've gone through something that they've conquered. And the point of these interviews is that you see this, you hear these stories and you know and understand that yes, someone probably has already gone through what you're going through right now and it can be done. And that's why I have these interviews. And today I have a really cool interview. I have Janet here with me. Thank you for coming, Janet.

Janet:

Thank you for having me.

Liz:

Absolutely. And so, Let's give our insiders here some information about what, what business do you have? What, what is it that you do and how are you serving people?

Janet:

So I primarily work with women and I have two different businesses, but the primary one is it really started as a passion project and it's called the every heart project. And it is a membership base women's organization that is truly focused on connecting women from the heart. So authentic connections, deep relationships, really forming a sisterhood. And then the other part of my business is called savvy girl media. And once again, I work with women, I guess I really like women, but I basically empower them through coaching. I call it a visibility coaching because if you can't show up and be seen, your clients can't find you and paying for you. So I really work mainly with a lot of entrepreneurs who are kind of scared to really get out there and put themselves out there. So really the two businesses overlap all the time, which I love.

Liz:

Yeah. And it, it does, it does sound like that. But now the first one when you mentioned about the every heart is every heart project.

Janet:

Yes, that's correct.

Liz:

Okay. Now why is this, um, is this every woman or is it entrepreneur? Women?

Janet:

It's all women. We really have all ages, all backgrounds, all religions. Some have businesses, some don't. We have some retired, we have some stay at home moms. It's really about just bringing women together, maybe who don't necessarily look and act just like you, but then realizing that when you really strip down all those titles and masks, we really are all the same.

Liz:

Absolutely. I can amen to that. Sause it's all, tell me about it. Right. So. Okay, so which the passion project, was that your first, was that your first business?

Janet:

You know, it was, it was a side business for us and actually I didn't even call it a business, up until this past year. So I started it about five years ago and it was just to get women together. I actually was in a corporate role at the time.

Janet:

I wasn't coaching of any kind. I, I really thought I was supposed to be this high level executive person. And I was living that dream, and climbing the corporate ladder. And so I had this, this women's group just on the side and it was just getting women together. It started with brunches and then an evening event and it was just really getting women out of their homes, out of their offices because that's what I was craving. You know, was time for my girlfriends again, you know, like the old time, the sleepovers and all that, you know, that we long, long time ago, in junior high, you know, I missed it. And so that's really where it started was as this passion project. And then over time I think I just put so much love into it and other women started really paying attention and it was like, hey, let's do a workshop or let's do a retreat.

Janet:

And so now it's like a full fledged business with a bookkeeper and everything. And I mean it's hard. Total dream. It's like a dream come true. I mean like most days I come home from my events with these women and I told my husband, I'm like, pinch me, this is not a job. You know, like this is so fun.

Liz:

Yeah, no, I can imagine because that's what you, that's what you love, right? I mean, Right. And that's what they mean by find what you love and you won't work a day in your life.

Janet:

Yes. And I used to think that was total BS. I'm not even kidding. Like I used to be that person that was like rolling your eyes like, yeah, yeah. Pretty much this started happening and the women started signing up and started showing up and like I would leave an event almost in tears because like some sort of magical connections really happened and I was just standing there in front of a podium going only Tao this is working. And I was like, Ooh. They might've been right about that whole passion thing.

Liz:

Yup, exactly. So was it, do you think that it started just because, you only had that feeling of like hanging out with the girlfriends or was this other things going on that kind of made you start thinking, okay, am I in the right spot in my life? Like, can we go into that a little bit?

Janet:

Yeah, so I, and I talk about the corporate gigs. So I did, I did 17 years in the corporate insurance world. And I climbed that and I did everything I was supposed to do and I became like the youngest female partner and I had this beautiful title on Linkedin. And yeah, I had this, what I thought was the dream job. And then, what I realized though was that a lot of women were coming into the industry and they would come to me and they were, they were unfulfilled and they were like, I feel like I don't belong or I don't know that this is what I want to do.

Janet:

And, and I had never allowed myself to even think those thoughts because I was, I was a very young single mom. I was 18 when my daughter was born. And so I just looked at the insurance world as, you know, like a very stable career. I didn't think about creative passions or following dreams or any of those things because they didn't have benefits and they didn't pay bills. And so that's, I didn't think about it, you know, I was like, okay, maybe that's not for me. But then as these women were coming before me and like looking to me for advice, because I had been there a long time and here I was young and I looked like I had everything together and they were like, Janet, I feel lost. I feel like, you know, I'm supposed to do more in this world.

Janet:

And I was always like, am I supposed to do more in this world? You know? And so I started asking that question and before you know it, like the universe or God or whoever you believe in has a very funny way of connecting those dots because all of a sudden I started asking those questions and then I started feeling really unfulfilled, in my career. And so that's actually when I lost my job and I wish I could say that I walked out on my own volition and grabbed my own books and said, bye, I'm out of here. But no, that wasn't, that happened. It was basically I was called into a room and was told that the company was preparing for some changes and they basically bought me out. And so I had a choice to walk away or to start over completely at a new agency.

Janet:

And I was like, I am not doing this again. Like I've devoted my entire life to this career. And I just said, I'm not doing this again. And so that was, three and a half years ago. And that's when I basically started savvy girl media, which is the coaching business. Because I really wanted, I wanted to work with those women who felt like they were destined for more because I had already, I sort of fell out of my job, and sort of woke up to my real purpose, which was like sort of activating women who know they're meant for more. And I love that word activate because that's really what happened to me. It was like I was like a Zombie, you know, like go into work every day for 17 years, you know, doing all the things, wearing the navy suit and feeling like I was, you know, important.

Janet:

And then one day I was none of those things and I had to like figure out who I was next.

Liz:

Yup. So your entire identity, which you didn't even have quote unquote, the awakening yourself pretty much stripped from you.

Janet:

Oh yeah. Overnight. It was on a Friday morning. I remember it like it was yesterday.

Liz:

Oh Wow. So you're, it's right though. Everything. Ha, everything happens in the way it's supposed to. Right.

Janet:

Absolutely. And I've no regrets about that. I still can think back to that day and be absolutely terrified, like feel that terrified feeling. And if someone tells me today when they call me and say, I just lost my job, I immediately feel that pain that they're feeling and that terror that, you know, scared feeling. So I definitely can relate to it.

Liz:

Yeah. Right. Yeah. I can only wait. Can I imagine? Oh, I was fired from McDonald's once, so not talk about it. Talk about a funny job and I'm not Downing McDonald's because I have to say it actually was my most enjoyable job I ever had in my life, so. Wow. Wow. Well, you never know. You never know. See, um, okay, so then, so stripped from you brand new life, starting from zero. Right. You started off with zero. Okay. So tell me how easy that was for you.

Janet:

Oh my gosh. So first of all, that was the word easy, doesn't even come to mind. I would say like for the first week or two of just even saying that I had my own business, I felt like a fraud. You know, I totally get that whole imposter syndrome. I could have written a whole book about that. But the, one of the things that I really identified with was waking up and feeling like, what do I do today?

Janet:

You know? I was so used to getting up and having that, that routine of getting in the car and driving to work and stopping at Starbucks and, and all those things. And I still wanted to do, you know, that routine because that, that's what felt like home to me. But then it was like, well, I can't really justify that, you know, like I can't drive to work. I don't work there anymore. But I really thought I would have like some time to kind of build this business and make money and do all the things. Cause everything I had read was like six to eight months of, you know, blood, sweat and tears. And I was like, okay, I hope so. You know, cause that doesn't sound so bad. But truthfully I had to kick it into high gear because three weeks after that happened to me, my husband was laid off, at the same time.

Janet:

And so all of a sudden we went from both at our highest earning potential too. Hello? You have five children looking at you and neither one of you have jobs. So let's just say like, I went into this like super determined mode. It was like, if I can't make money in 90 days, I'm going to have to go back into the insurance industry. And that's really what I mean. I had like the, the whiteboard with the, the goals and the numbers that were needed. And if I didn't hit it, I mean it was, it was back to corporate life for me. And there's a lot of people that love corporate jobs. I thought I did too, until I had a taste of running my own business. Then I was like, oh, I'm totally unemployable now. Like I like, I would not work well for anybody. I'm like, I would constantly be sitting there thinking I could do this better.

Liz:

There's gotta be a better way. Right? The, I have to say the coolest thing that one of my mentors ever made me do, and it was an oh, huge Aha. And a slap to the face for me is a, and I would love either for you to do this or in the people that are listening to do this. And I don't know, actually I'll ask if you've ever done this. So she told me to take a piece of paper and draw a line and the beginning, not write the first step, but like in words you would put, that was your first job ever, any employment you ever had. Right. And then throughout the line to where you are today, you would do it a tick mark for every employment you had. Okay. First I noticed I had a ton of employments and I was like, okay, that's crazy.

Liz:

But whatever. But the point was is that you figure out what was one thing that you enjoyed in each position. Right? Anything could be anything. And you would write it down and then you would look at, okay, what are the similarities? Because that would show to you, this is something that you truly care about. Right? And it may be something that you excel at, right? So it could be in corporate, could be in nonprofit, it could be in anything. I noticed in every single position I had from beginning to end, I hated being employed. It's by common thread. So you're right, there you go. So you got the taste and,

Janet:

Yeah, and I would say if I did that same exercise, I've never done it before. I did something similar. But the thing that I've loved about, my career in the insurance world was mentoring and guiding other people. And that was really what I built my new business on, was, you know, how can I pour knowledge and wisdom and love into a business, built on what I love to do and then not any of the crap that I didn't want to do.

Liz:

Exactly. Exactly. Did you feel, so this is something that's coming to me. Did you feel, um, as a kid when you were younger, did you feel any of those type of characteristics that you then probably suppress a little bit when you just got the insurance job because that was a good job, right? Was there anything that you felt before, like having your child and doing all that that kind of was being suppressed a little bit?

Janet:

You know? honestly I had a very complicated childhood, so, I had a mother with a severe mental illness. So I grew up really fast and I think that over the years of like being a teenager and I did have all those creative passions and now I am pursuing, I think that I suppressed because I didn't have the support at home. Like I have is more of a caretaker, you know, at a young age, changing schools a lot. And you know, she was in and out of hospitals. And so I think that whenever I did finally become a mom and I sort of was like, okay, I'm going to do this on my own. I think that I just continued that whole suppressing of what I really wanted in life and I've, I feel like I was always you know, influenced by either you are successful and making money or you're creative and having fun.

Janet:

And I felt like there was this line between the two that I just assumed was always there. And I would say over the years I sort of have realized that a lot of us, especially women, have that, that invisible line that we've created where we think we have to be miserable, you know, to make money and that if it is fun or it is creative that it's probably not going to bring us, you know, money like the starving artist thing. And so I think that I probably always had, that below because I was also taking care of my mom and I was taking care of my little brother. So obviously I've always had a heart for people. But now I guess it's really manifested full circle. Cause in my women's group, I really do reach out to those that may be, feel like they're sort of lost in the chaos. Because I remember what that was like. So I think that that really, like maybe I did suppress it, but it only helped me really figure out the passion later.

Liz:

Right. And so, and you understand those feelings. So that also helps.

Janet:

Right? Right. Like, cause what, you know, for me, the greatest compliment that, um, one of my women and we call them sisters, one of our heart sisters, one of the greatest compliment they can say is, is I feel like Janet, you know, really sees me, you know. And that's really what my goal is as a leader. In my organization. And you know, I talked about this with my husband all the time. I have this fear that it's going to get to some number of members where I'm not going to be able to personally see everyone. So I really focus a lot on that. You know, when we have a new member to making sure she knows that she's seen and that she's heard and that I want to know more about her, because I also know what it's like to not feel seen.

Liz:

Yes, absolutely. With this, membership and you have workshops and these events and all of that, where are they local to you? Are they nationwide? How does this work?

Janet:

So right now, most of the events are local. Um, we started a women's retreat, about three and a half years ago. And the idea was to lock women in a hotel for a weekend, and just pour a lot 11 to them. And, the first retreat was sort of like, you know, they just showed up and trusted us, and said, okay, you know, well, whatever you guys do is fun. So I'm here to do it. And we had 29 women at that first retreat and it was like magical. And so after that, all the women were like, we want more of that. So we've actually had three retreats. Our last one was also local. We're in the Dallas area and we had 50 women at that event. And then we have our fourth one that's in November. And right now they're all in Dallas.

Janet:

We do have a couple of out of state members, but they typically fly in, for the annual event. We also have monthly events and most of them are not flying in for those. Although many of them have begged me to Facebook live them so that they can be a part of the action. We're working on that. So there's really a true magic when women come together in person. And so that's what I'm really trying to get back to. Like I love social. I mean, I love that we're chatting across the country right now. You know, I love the opportunities that it brings, but there's nothing stronger than a woman sitting next to you or across from you and saying, girl, I've been there. You know, that there's a magic in that

Liz:

100%. Absolutely. That's why we love going to these things. Right? That's why we want to, I mean, at least I'm speaking for myself because I am the biggest extrovert ever and a love to be. That's where I get energy. I mean, I love people. I love being around and I love seeing, and you probably see this all the time. It's when it's, when they, they finally just smile and you know, and where they are like, ah, you know, like finally I can just be me and I just awesome. Right. It's do you see?

Janet:

Yes. And that's, that is, that is my biggest mission. So what's funny is I'm also a ridiculously huge extrovert and I tend to attract introverts. So, probably 90% of my business are introverts and probably 80% of my membership are introverts. So the, I always tease them cause the first couple of meetings, you know, I've got like 50 or 60 women out there and I'm like, okay guys, we're going to have, you know, an exercise, a really gonna open up and talk to each other. And I'm like, no one run for the door, you know, because like I know that like their first instinct is like, oh no, she's not going to get me to talk. You know? So that's my goal. When I look out and see all the introverts laughing and hugging and I'm like, Oh yeah, we did it.

Liz:

That's it though. That's the best fail. I love that. That is absolutely the best. I'm so I'm very happy for you because that is, that is unbelievable. I'm some like I also want to have events someday. I want to be able to have retreats. So I, I see the power in it. That's why I very happy for you cause it's unbelievable. I've been to many so I know what it feels like.

Janet:

Yeah. I love attending them. I love hosting. It's a whole other kind of feeling. But I love attending to, and I just love anywhere where women are opening up and like discovering more of who they are. Because that's, I mean that's what we need more of, more women ready to activate.

Liz:

Yes, absolutely. So then tell, okay, so I have, I have two questions that I really want to get to, but, you said you have a daughter. Yes. Oh, wait, you said you had five kids?

Janet:

Yeah, so I had my daughter at 18. And I was a young single mom. Her father passed away. It was just the two of us. And, I want to tell you like single mom hood is like totally the hardest job I've ever done in my life. But thankfully, you know, we, we really just put our heads together and work through the hard times and she's actually graduating from college and three weeks, with the degree that she did in three years.

Janet:

So she is like Super Smart, and very talented. So that's really exciting. So she's the oldest. And when I met my husband, he had two and I had three. So we have kind of a Brady bunch. Love it. And so all, uh, basically teenagers and young adults. So, all girls and the youngest is a boy. Wow. So, yeah, when we got together and was like, Oh, you have four teenage daughters. And they were like, good luck with that for some of that. And actually there, it's up and down. You know, when you have teenage girls, it's up and down anyway. But there there's been certain holidays where like everybody gets along pretty well. Then there's other holidays or we kind of just chuckle over, like we'll talk about this one later.

Liz:

Yes, I can imagine.

Janet:

But that's, that's life.

Liz:

Yeah. So what I would really like to know is how do you feel or see how this is a, has affected your daughters when they're growing up, seeing you right. Be empowered and completely have to figure that out and work,

Janet:

You know. I would say I've really seen it most with my oldest, because when she was accepted to college, at LSU, we went and took her for the tour and we did all the, you know, the parent things you're supposed to do. And she toured the law school and at the time she was like, I'm going to be a lawyer because that's, you know, where the money's at and I can do this and I can do that and I want to travel and all these things. And we're very supportive, you know, where are the kind of parents where we're like, whatever it is that makes you happy, like we're pretty okay with it.

Janet:

We don't really force anything on our kids because we know how that works. And so, over the years though, my daughters have all been involved in the different events. And so my oldest daughter actually is getting her teaching certification. Instead of going the law school route, she's realized that she would rather shape other minds and so she's going to be teaching middle school English. So that's actually like probably the biggest shocking thing, to see that transition of her going from everything's about money and the high power job to, you know what, I really just wanna feel good about myself. And I would say a lot of that is also attributed to my husband. So he was laid off within three weeks of my losing my job. And at the time he was a a 25 year architect and very successful.

Janet:

And he actually left that entire business after being laid off and he's now a special education teacher. And he specializes in autistic and nonverbal kids. And so I think that her watching us both go from, you know, I guess the right career or whatever, the right jobs, you know, to what we actually want to do. And I think that really shaped her and we're already seeing our other kiddos kind of fall in line, with some of that, you know, just kind of being okay to say like, I don't know if that's going to be right for me. You know, our second oldest, which is my husband's oldest, you know, she just got a job, with a Jewish temple that like, she feels very called to do. You know, and, and maybe in the past it might not have been the perfect job, you know? But she feels very called to do it. And so just seeing them answer those calls and not be so scared of like just trying something, it's been really powerful. So the other ones are all still in high school and middle school, so we're still just supporting them and watching them grow. But they've all been a part of the project at some point. Even my son has been involved in some of it, inadvertently helping me stuff envelopes or something.

Liz:

Oh, that's awesome though. I think that's great. And it's, and the ones in high school, they just figuring it out. Right. Cause we had to figure it out, so, right.

Janet:

And, and that's what I tell him. You know, my, my middle daughter, you know, is a very talented singer, very musically gifted. And she always feels like, you know, music is her colleague and the old me, you know, would have easily said, well, you really want to get a steady job. You know, you know, like, I can even hear that, that rhetoric in my head. But it's funny because going through this process now, I'm like, Oh yeah, you could start it starting at your channel, start an Instagram channel. You know, I'm like, I'm like, do those things, you know, pursue them now and who knows where they might lead. And if, and if college isn't where you want to go, then that's fine too. And, it's so funny because five years ago, that would have been definitely nothing that would've come out of my mind.

Liz:

Agree. Same here. Same exact thing because that was, that was the way, like my parents came here from Portugal and they were like, oh, the way is college and Jot right. So degree, high degree and go to the, you know, so it is, it's hard, old habits in right to right. Cool. So, there also is a book I hear.

Janet:

Yes. So I'm so excited about this book. So first of all, I've written a couple of books. I and I did write a book called pizza on the floor a few years ago. That is all about my journey of having a mom with borderline personality disorder. So if any of the listeners find themselves struggling with mental illness and their family, that book may be, of hope to you. And so that was my very first book I really felt called to write. I didn't market it, um, a lot because I didn't want to become sort of the poster child for mental illness. But I did feel like it was very therapeutic to get out there. I've written in a couple other projects, and then I wrote, a branding book that goes along with my business.

Janet:

But last year, we were in the middle of a bit of a crisis in my local sisterhood and there was drama happening and some conflict and things that weren't getting resolved. And we had some sisters leave the group because of it in, it was really heartbreaking for me because this is a heart centered mission and this is not supposed to be like every other women's group. And, so I kind of really like kept on thinking, how do I make this different, how to make this different. And you know, I can only stand up in front of everybody every month and say the same thing over and over again, but nothing's getting through to the right people. And so I was actually at the pool, you know, with my husband and I was reading another book and all of a sudden it hit me like a ton of bricks, that I had to write about the rules of the sisterhood and how maybe it's time we rewrite those roles because apparently we're not following them.

Janet:

We're doing a very good job. And so that's where this book was, was really created. It's called the new rules of the sisterhood. And it's totally like my voice. You know, it's Kinda sarcastic and fun, but at the same time it's like lighthearted. But it's also stuff that we all need to hear as women. You know, like the very first rule is add a leap to the table. You know, we're all told that there's not enough seats. You know, women are competition and I called bs, you know, because some of my greatest strength has come from other women. And so that's really where this book was born. So it's basically a handful of rules. Some of them are a little more serious, some of them are totally hilarious. I'm like, rule number seven is upgrade your bra and you have to read to find out why. But we all know as women, as soon as I said that we're all thinking I need a new Bra. So this, this book is really, it's written for women, but it's written about all of us. And I mean, it could, it could be in the hands of a teenage girl. I could go in the hands of a retiree. I mean it, you will find no matter where you are in your walk.

Liz:

Oh, I love that. And so, I saw you had a quick, interview, was it on your local TV channel as well?

Janet:

Yeah, so here in, in Texas we have something called Good Morning Texas. So very similar to good morning America, which is next on my list. But yeah, good. Good morning. Texas was was kind enough to ask me to come on the show and it was on the launch day of my book, which was just totally awesome. So I got to talk about it and showcase, I even got to give some books away to the anchors, but it was totally unexpected. But it was such a blessing and my first time ever on TV. And I will say I'm totally addicted and I'm ready for the next appearance.

Liz:

I can imagine like that's, that's what I was just speaking to Robin and that's like one of the things on my list is, is definitely I want to do ted talks and I clearly I want to be on TV. Like, why wouldn't I? So,

Janet:

And I, this wasn't really like on like a list for me, you know, like, I mean, I love Facebook lives. I love Facebook, lives with other people. I love podcasts and radio shows and, but then like I just, it didn't even occur to me that I needed to be on like the local television or whatever. And I just, when I did it though, it was like, oh, okay. So there's like a magic that happens, you know, when that camera comes on and, and it's funny, everybody that saw it was like, you look so comfortable where you nervous? And I'm like, I really wasn't very nervous. I'm like, I'm like, I feel like I was supposed to talk about what I'm supposed to talk about. And it came very natural. So yeah, I'm totally ready for another TV appearance.

Liz:

Oh, that's great. You'll have to keep us posted. Is there anything that you feel that you'd like to share that I wasn't able to touch upon in our conversation?

Janet:

You know, not really. I mean, this has been so fun. I, and I feel like I got to really kind of share like a lot of my journey with you and with everyone listening. So I really appreciate the opportunity. The only thing that I would love to say is, get the book, you know, the book is supposed to be healing and it's supposed to be empowering, but it's also funny. And then there is a book club called the new rules of the Sisterhood Book Club where you can join for free on Facebook and you can interact with women all over the country and possibly the world. Now, we might have some, some foreigners in there that are my new best friends. But I would just encourage any woman watching, you know, find your tribe and if you don't have a tribe, join mine and I'll help you form one where you're at.

Liz:

Absolutely. Awesome. So we, so I will have all this in the show notes, but where could is, is there like a website where we can find out more about you or where's the best place for them to go

Janet:

so they can go to a savvygirlmedia.com or EveryHeartProject.com there's lots of information, about me on both of course every heart. Is a little bit more about the mission and the project, but under leadership you'll find more about me as well.

Liz:

Perfect. But I will also, in the show notes, I'll have a link for, for the book club as well as, as the book title and all of that so that if anyone wants to have that information easy, it'll be right there in the show notes so they can find it.

Janet:

Thank you so much. I appreciate it.

Liz:

Absolutely. Thank you so much for coming. I really enjoyed your story and I knew that it would probably hit with some, some women that listen, so I'm really, really grateful for that.

Janet:

Thank you. I'm so honored.

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